All posts tagged: Bikutsi

Têtes Brûlées and Bikutsi

Curator Christine Eyene and music journalist, author and filmmaker Blaise Ndjehoya discuss Bikutsi music as part of the Pan African Space Station POP-UP radio hosted by Fondation Cartier during the Nomadic Nights programmed alongside the exhibition “Beauté Congo – 1926-2915 – Congo Kitoko”, curated by André Magnin. This conversation follows from the exhibition “All Of Us Have A Sense Of Rhythm” developed by Eyene as part of the Curators’ Series # 8 at David Roberts Art Foundation, London, (June-Aug. 2015). The project drew from the cultural heritage of Bikutsi to explore rhythmic sources in material, immaterial and performative productions within traditional and contemporary African cultures, and their legacy in mainstream cultures. Bikutsi, meaning ‘Beat the Earth’ or ‘Smash the Ground’ in Ewondo (Cameroon), is a fast pace percussive genre using balafons (African xylophones) that emerged in the 1940s. In their discussion Eyene and Ndjehoya will look at the origins of the genre, its message and style, its influence in the formation of cultural identity, as well as its pioneering figures including Los Camaroes / Messi …

All Of Us Have A Sense Of Rhythm

An exhibition exploring notions of rhythm through visual arts, poetry, sound, music and dance. With Larry Achiampong, Younès Baba-Ali, Julien Bayle, John Cage, Ayoka Chenzira, Em’Kal Eyongakpa, Jon Hopkins, Langston Hughes, Evan Ifekoya, Zak Ové, Michel Paysant, Anna Raimondo, Robin Rhode, David Shrigley and William Titley. Curated by Christine Eyene. In an anecdote relating how he became a poet as a pupil – a discipline requiring a sense of rhythm – Harlem Renaissance legend Langston Hughes (1902-1967) explained that he was the subject of the stereotypical idea that all black people have a sense of rhythm. Drawing from Hughes’ remark on the assumption that “all of us had a sense of rhythm”, this exhibition presents an original research into rhythmic sources in performative, material, and immaterial productions within African traditional and contemporary cultures, and extends this assertion to the field of contemporary art; opening up the “us”, referring to black people, to a cross-cultural and multidisciplinary engagement with notions of rhythm. The project takes its cue from Senegalese philosopher Léopold Sédar Senghor’s reflection on African …