All posts filed under: Sound

We Have Delivered Ourselves from the Tonal

We Have Delivered Ourselves from the Tonal – Of, with, towards, on Julius Eastman A research, exhibition, performance program, 2-days symposium, and a book produced by SAVVY Contemporary and MaerzMusik – Festival for Time Issues We Have Delivered Ourselves from the Tonal – Of, with, towards, on Julius Eastman is an exhibition, and a program of performances, concerts and lectures that deliberate around concepts beyond the predominantly Western musicological format of the tonal or harmonic. The project looks at African American composer, musician and performer Julius Eastman’s work beyond the framework of what is today understood as minimalist music, within a larger, always gross and ever-growing understanding of it—i.e. conceptually and geo-contextually. Together with musicians, visual artists, researchers and archivers we aim to explore a non-linear genealogy of Eastman’s practice and his cultural, political and social weight, and situate his work within a broader rhizomatic relation of musical epistemologies and practices. For the project, new substantial artworks and musical pieces have been commissioned and will be premiered in Berlin. These include a filmic work and …

A sound art performance by Elsa M’bala

In summer 2017, Cameroonian sound artist Elsa M’bala (aka AMET) was invited by Yamamoto Keiko Rochaix in London to perform as part of the Art Night 2017 event coinciding with the exhibition Still unresolved and very much ongoing curated by Christine Eyene. This video is an excerpt from the performance. It was also presented as part of the video documentation exhibited in Sounds Like Her, a New Art Exchange touring exhibition showcasing women sound art practice. One of the very few African women sound artists, Elsa M’Bala was born in Yaounde in 1988 where she grew up before moving to Germany with her family in 1999. After completing her studies in Social Sciences in Munster, Elsa spent a few years traveling Europe and was introduced to various artistic spheres. She began performing as a singer-songwriter, musician and poet before venturing into sound art in 2010 and relocating to Yaounde in 2012. She is now based between Yaounde and Berlin. Her work explores African and Cameroonian history and archive material. It addresses gender discourses and pushes …

Let’s Play Vinyl

Goldsmiths – University of London is hosting a vinyl and sound system celebration this January with an exhibition, discussions, workshops and club nights. An exhibition entitled Let’s Play Vinyl, featuring 21 images by photographer Elliot Baxter who was commissioned by Let’s Go Yorkshire, portrays the current generation of reggae sound system operators. Kicking off the exhibition is a four-day festival at Goldsmiths’ campus in New Cross, including Sound System Outernational Vinyl Weekender from 11 to 14 January with a launch party at Goldsmiths Professor Stuart Hall Building; a screening of Legacy In The Dust: The Four Aces Story (2008) by Winstan Whitter; Skin Deep Sonic Transmissions and Unit 137 full sound systems; workshops on how to build your own sound system and toasting; a conference and the launch of Stuart Hall: Conversations, Projects and Legacies, edited by Julian Henriques and David Morley with Vana Goblot. The book examines the career of the cultural studies pioneer, interrogating his influence and revealing lesser-known facets of his work. About the festival, Professor Julian Henriques, from the Department of …

Sounding our thoughts to the West

Carte blanche to Christine Eyene: Sounding our thoughts to the West Developed as part of Saout Africa(s), a collaboration with SAVVY Funk, Berlin for Every Time A Ear di Soun, documenta 14 Radio Program, this carte blanche explores Cameroon’s Anglophone identity through culture with Christine Eyene (art historian and curator, University of Central Lancashire), Dzekashu Macviban (writer and editor of Bakwa Magazine), Elsa M’bala (singer, composer and sound artist) and Tito Valery (artist and radio host). In November 2016, the resistance against the marginalisation of the English-speaking parts of Cameroon (located West of the country) was met with repression and the shutdown of the internet for several months in those regions, jeopardizing everyday life, the economy, education and cultural exchanges. Through conversations, texts and sound experiments, including a new sound performance by Elsa M’bala, this programme will reflect on how the linguistic colonial legacy continues to affect life, culture and politics in Cameroon and Africa today. About the participants: Based in Yaounde, Dzekashu Macviban is a writer and freelance journalist who focuses on the intersection between …