Murder Machine photo gallery

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Visitors reading copies of Transition magazines, part of The Otolith Group installation. Murder Machine opening. Photo: Shane Serrano.

Curated by Christine Eyene, Guild Research Fellow in Contemporary Art at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) Preston as part of the Making Histories Visible (MHV) project, and developed in collaboration with Ormston House, Murder Machine takes its cue from thoughts and writings by Irish linguist and activist Pádraig Pearse, notably his pamphlet The Murder Machine (1916). The project proposes to revisit issues around the English language in the colonisation process in Ireland and draws parallels with African literature.

The exhibition’s main feature consists in the installation One out of many Afrophilias (2014) by The Otolith Group, presented in dialogue with images by South African photographer George Hallett, housed at MHV’s archive. Both sets of works focus on African literature and are shown alongside a display of the curator’s books relating to African literature and South Africa’s Soweto Uprising that took place on 16 June 1976; this year marks the uprising’s fortieth anniversary.

Also programmed as part of Murder Machine are a performance by Ceara Conway produced by Limerick-based DJ Deviant held during the exhibition opening (16/04), a conversation between The Otolith Group and Christine Eyene (11/05), a new sound piece by Linda O’Keeffe (12/05), and a workshop by Irish hip-hop trio Rusangano Family (2/06).

Murder Machine is presented at Ormston House in partnership with EVA International and Making Histories Visible as part the Federation of arts organisations and institutions responding to the curatorial concept of Ireland’s Biennial 2016: Still (the) Barbarians curated by Koyo Kouoh.

Murder Machine project logos

See here for more information on the project.

Click on any image to view a photo gallery of the installation and exhibition opening held on Sat 16 April 2016.

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