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Sonia Boyce: Retrospective

Manchester Art Gallery presents the first retrospective exhibition by artist Sonia Boyce. Focusing on work from the mid-1990s to the present the exhibition will reflect Boyce’s move from her earlier drawing and collage which explored her own position as a black British woman, towards more improvised, collaborative ways of working. These unpredictable, open processes have been documented through a range of media including photography, film and wallpaper. The gallery has also commissioned Boyce to make a new collaborative live work for the exhibition. New commission Sonia Boyce is fascinated by ‘what people do when they come together’. She is currently working with the gallery team and invited collaborators, including Lasana Shabazz and drag artists from Family Gorgeous, to make a new work, Six Acts, a night-time group takeover of the gallery exploring ‘gender trouble’ among the gallery’s 19th century painting displays and wider culture. This new commission will be made into a film installation and shown for the first time in the exhibition. Other works on display For You, Only You, 2007 is a film of …

Lubaina Himid, A Fashionable Marriage, 1986 [detail]. Mixed media installation. Courtesy of the artist and Hollybush Gardens, London. Installation view, The Place is Here, Nottingham Contemporary, 2017.

Lubaina Himid: Hard Times

Lubaina Himid, A Fashionable Marriage, 1986 [detail]. Mixed media installation. Courtesy of the artist and Hollybush Gardens, London. Installation view, The Place is Here, Nottingham Contemporary, 2017.   The Harris Museum in Preston is presenting an exhibition by 2017 Turner Prize winner and Preston-based artist Professor Lubaina Himid MBE.  The exhibition is entitled Hard Times, a title chosen by the artist in reference to Charles Dickens’ eponym novel inspired by his visit to Preston during the workers’ Lock-out of 1853. At the heart of the display is A Fashionable Marriage (1987), Himid’s reworking of Hogarth’s painting. Visitors can walk through this theatrical setting and its passionate challenge to the hypocrisy of the art world and Eighties society – ideas that remain relevant thirty years on. Her installation Bone in the China: Success to the Africa Trade (1985) asks ‘where are the memories … of black people’s lives’? Inside the Invisible (2002), seen for the first time in the UK, gives voices to the patients excluded from society in a now abandoned Norwegian leprosy hospital. Each of the 40 small paintings is a different pattern …